Vajra Periodic Table

The Vajra Periodic Table accurately maps the electron structure around the nucleus. The grouping into electron orbitals was presented in a similar form in Fernando Dufour's 3D Periodic Table. The Vajra layout expands on Mr. Dufour's presentation by splitting the periodic table into two distinct regions.

Vajra Periodic Table

 

The various groupings of metal elements and non-metal elements stand out in the Vajra Periodic Table and reveals the clearest pattern yet underlying the atomic electron structure. Here are some examples for how the Vajra table helps in the understanding of electron structure.

  1. There is a clear pattern of alternation and balance in the electron structure. Once a shell is filled up to its nobel gas element, the next fill element alternates to the opposite side of the electron.
  2. Each shell always begins with two spaces.
  3. The first shell has two spaces and occurs only once in the center.
  4. The second and third shells have two additional and then six spaces, each.
  5. The third and fourth shells have two, eight, and then six spaces, each.
  6. The fourth and fifth shells have two, ten, eight, and then six spaces, each.
  7. The fifth and sixth shells have two, twelve, ten, eight, and then six spaces, each.
  8. The final band in each shell, aside from the inner most shell, always has six spaces.
  9. The noble gases, with the exception of helium, are all located on shells with exactly six electrons.
  10. The non-metals and "other" metals also always occur on the bands with six spaces.
  11. All of the transitional metals occur when there are eight or more electrons on a single band.
  12. The alkali metals always form on the first space of the band of two (s band).
  13. The alkaline Earth metals always form on the second space of the band of two (s band).
  14. Not only is there a right-left "polarity" of alternations, but there is also an up-down polarity of alternations. The s orbital bands always have the alkaline Earth metals relatively down, and the akali metals relatively up.
  15. The non-metals and other metals have both a right-left and up-down relationship with each other.

The symmetry of the shells suggests the electrons build their structure beginning with the inner most position and expand each additional electron in a pattern extending away from the nucleus. The symmetry further suggests that the geometry of the atom partially determines the characteristics of the atom.